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The South Carolina Society
of the
Sons of the American Revolution

Revolutionary War - Cannon Scene clipart and images.


The Battle of Sullivan's Island

The Battle of Sullivan's Island in South Carolina, was a decisive American victory over the British, on June 28, 1776. The outcome on Sullivan's Island would prevent other British efforts in Charleston for over three more years, and it revived the American spirit. The pride of victory at Sullivan Island was initiative for more Americans to support the break from Great Britain, because the victory was achieved against all odds. Sullivan's Island is now renamed, and known as Fort Moultrie in honor of Colonel William Moultrie's success in defending Charleston. Pictured is Sgt William Jasper, 2nd South Carolina Regiment, who distinguished himself in the defense of Fort Sullivan on June 28, when a shell from a British warship shot away the flagstaff. He recovered the South Carolina flag, raised it on a temporary staff and held it under fire until a new staff was installed . Governor John Rutledge gave his sword to Jasper in recognition of his bravery.


The South Carolina Society was organized April 18th, 1889 in a room at the State Capital in Columbia. After the election of officers, the organizing group appointed delegates to the proposed National Convention in New York City to be held later in the month. The National Society was organized April 30th, 1889. Those descendents of our brave ancestors, whose vision and courage gave us our great nation, formed a fraternal, patriotic, and civic organization to perpetuate the basic principles of freedom to honor our founding fathers. The name adopted by the organization was the Sons of the American Revolution. The South Carolina Society began granting charters to chapters in 1923. Currently nineteen chapters promote the American spirit through fraternal meetings, commemorative observances of events and battles, educational materials, projects, lectures, tours and publications. South Carolina is rich in historical events of the American Revolution. From the mountains to the coast, South Carolina experienced the most battles and skirmishes of the war. The seventeen chapters of our society sponsor annual anniversary ceremonies of many of the battles and events.

Relics of the Revolution may be found throughout the state in some federal and state parks, museums, and libraries. Markers are found in our countryside reminding us of the sacrifice of our ancestors. The Society seeks to mark graves of our Revolutionary ancestors. Since the organization of the South Carolina Society, over 3,000 have filled the membership ranks. The present membership is about 700.

The South Carolina Society of the American Revolution joins in effort with the Daughters of the American Revolution, the Children of the American Revolution, and all patriotic and historical groups in keeping alive the ideals of our ancestors who gave us our United States of America.

Member since June 24, 1960