2015 Constitution Week September 14th - 20th

John Rutledge Charles Cotesworth Pinckney 
Charles Pinckney Pierce Butler

2015 Constitution Week September 14th - 20th

Oddly enough, Constitution Day, also known as Citizenship Day, began being recognized in 2005 and is an American holiday honoring the day 39 delegates to the Constitutional Convention who signed the United States Constitution. This historic date was September 17, 1787. South Carolinians who signed the US Constitution in this order are 15th John Rutledge, 16th Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, 17th Charles Pinckney and 18th Pierce Butler (at top left to right).

The United States Constitution, the supreme law of the United States of America originally comprised seven articles, delineates the national frame of government. Its first three articles entrench the doctrine of the separation of powers, whereby the federal government is divided into three branches: the legislative, consisting of the bicameral Congress; the executive, consisting of the President; and the judicial, consisting of the Supreme Court and other federal courts. Articles Four, Five and Six entrench concepts of federalism, describing the rights and responsibilities of state governments and of the states in relationship to the federal government. Article Seven establishes the procedure subsequently used by the thirteen States to ratify it.

Since the Constitution came into force in 1789, it has been amended twenty-seven times. In general, the first ten amendments, known collectively as the Bill of Rights, offer specific protections of individual liberty and justice and place restrictions on the powers of government. At seven articles and twenty-seven amendments, it is the shortest written constitution in force. All five pages of the original U.S. Constitution are written on parchment.

The Constitution of the United States is the first constitution of its kind, and has influenced the constitutions of other nations.

Signing the Constitution, September 17, 1787 as twelve states were represented; 74 delegates were named, 55 attended and 39 signed.

The South Carolina Society
of the
Sons of the American Revolution

The South Carolina Society was organized April 18th, 1889 in a room at the State Capital in Columbia. After the election of officers, the organizing group appointed delegates to the proposed National Convention in New York City to be held later in the month. The National Society was organized April 30th, 1889. Those descendents of our brave ancestors, whose vision and courage gave us our great nation, formed a fraternal, patriotic, and civic organization to perpetuate the basic principles of freedom to honor our founding fathers. The name adopted by the organization was the Sons of the American Revolution. The South Carolina Society began granting charters to chapters in 1923. Currently nineteen chapters promote the American spirit through fraternal meetings, commemorative observances of events and battles, educational materials, projects, lectures, tours and publications. South Carolina is rich in historical events of the American Revolution. From the mountains to the coast, South Carolina experienced the most battles and skirmishes of the war. The nineteen chapters of our society sponsor annual anniversary ceremonies of many of the battles and events.

Relics of the Revolution may be found throughout the state in some federal and state parks, museums, and libraries. Markers are found in our countryside reminding us of the sacrifice of our ancestors. The Society seeks to mark graves of our Revolutionary ancestors. Since the organization of the South Carolina Society, over 3,000 have filled the membership ranks. As of November 2014 membership was 849.

The South Carolina Society of the American Revolution joins in effort with the Daughters of the American Revolution, the Children of the American Revolution, and all patriotic and historical groups in keeping alive the ideals of our ancestors who gave us our United States of America.

Member since June 24, 1960